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Program Profile: Minnesota’s Enhanced Supervision Release Program

Evidence Rating: No Effects - One study No Effects - One study

Date: This profile was posted on April 24, 2017

Program Summary

This is an intensive, supervised release program for persons at high risk for reoffense and who are mandated to residential treatment upon release from prison. The program gradually reduces restrictions as the persons on parole transition back into the community. The program is rated No Effects. Results showed no significant effects on recidivism measures, including rearrest, revocation for technical violations, reconviction, and days in prison.

Program Description

Program Goals
The Minnesota’s Enhanced Supervision Release Program, also called Intensive Supervised Release (ISR), requires enhanced supervision of persons on parole who are at high risk for reoffending. The stated program goals are to punish the persons convicted of a crime, protect the public, facilitate employment of the person on parole  with intensive community supervision, and require payment of restitution ordered by the court to compensate the victims of the persons convicted of a crime (Deschenes, Turner, and Petersilia 1995).
 
Population Eligibility
Incarcerated persons are eligible to participate in ISR if they have served at least two thirds of their pronounced sentence, are at high risk for reoffense, and will be mandated to residential treatment (i.e., a halfway house) upon release from prison.
 
Program Components
This program is designed to provide maximum community surveillance and supervision. The participants are expected to spend approximately 40 hours per week focused on work, job-search activities, education or training, or chemical dependency treatment.  

The four phases of ISR gradually reduce the restrictions placed on the persons on parole over their time in the program. The first phase, which lasts approximately 6 months, is strict house arrest, including four meetings per week with an Intensive Community Supervision (ICS) agent and random weekly drug testing. The second phase, which lasts 4 months, is modified house arrest with one face-to-face meeting weekly with an ICS agent and twice-monthly drug testing. The third phase lasts 2 months and consists of modified house arrest, weekly face-to-face ICS agent meetings, and random drug tests at the ICS agent’s discretion. The fourth and final phase, which lasts for the rest of the supervision period, is a house curfew, with two ICS agent meetings per month and discretionary drug testing.
 
Key Personnel
The program was designed to have 20 to 25 supervising agents serving 12 to15 clients at once.

Evaluation Outcomes

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Study 1
Reconviction
Deschenes, Turner, and Petersilia (1995) found there were no significant differences between the Intensive Supervised Release (ISR) treatment and comparison groups for likelihood of reconviction at the 12-month follow up. 
 
Days in Custody
The results showed that there were no significant differences between the ISR treatment and comparison groups for the number of days in custody at the 12-month follow up.
 
Rearrest
The results showed that there were no significant differences between the ISR treatment and comparison groups for any arrest at the 12-month follow up.
 
Revocation
The results showed there were no significant differences between the ISR treatment and comparison groups for having their parole or probation revoked for a technical violation at the 12-month follow up.
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Evaluation Methodology

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Study 1
Deschenes, Turner, and Petersilia (1995) conducted a randomized controlled trial to measure the effectiveness of Minnesota’s Enhanced Supervision Program, also called Intensive Supervised Release (ISR), on persons on parole who are at high risk of reoffense. Institution caseworkers reviewed the treatment plans of incarcerated persons who were scheduled to be released from prison within the next 6 months. An ISR information packet was completed for those who met the eligibility criteria for a mandatory residential program, and Intensive Community Supervision (ICS) agents were asked to confirm the acceptability of the residential placement. The pool of eligible ISR participants were randomly assigned to treatment and comparison groups. 
 
The treatment group consisted of 95 incarcerated persons who were at high risk for reoffense and received ISR. The comparison group included 81 participants who received routine supervised release. The treatment group was 96 percent male, with an average age of 30.1 years at their current conviction. The comparison group was 100 percent male, with an average age of 29.4 years at their current conviction. The racial breakdown for the treatment group was 35 percent African American and 47 percent white, whereas the comparison group was 32 percent African American and 62 percent white. There were no significant differences between the groups on baseline demographics. 
 
Recidivism was measured four ways: rearrest, revocation (i.e., revocation of parole for a technical violation), reconviction, and the number of days in prison upon reincarceration. The Department of Corrections official record data was used to measure outcome recidivism data. Outcomes measured were examined for the 12 months after the participants were released from prison.
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Cost

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The Intensive Supervised Release (ISR) program cost $10,468, which was more than double the typical supervision program cost of $4,746 (Deschenes, Turner, and Petersilia 1995).
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Evidence-Base (Studies Reviewed)

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These sources were used in the development of the program profile:

Study 1
Deschenes, Elizabeth Piper, Susan Turner, and Joan Petersilia. 1995. “A Dual Experiment in Intensive Community Supervision: Minnesota’s Prison Diversion and Enhanced Supervised Release Program.” The Prison Journal 75(3):330–56.

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Additional References

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These sources were used in the development of the program profile:

Deschenes, Elizabeth Piper, Susan Turner, and John Petersilia. 1995. Intensive Community Supervision in Minnesota: A Dual Experiment in Prison Diversion and Enhanced Supervised Release. Santa Monica, Calif..: Rand.

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Program Snapshot

Gender: Both

Race/Ethnicity: Black, White

Setting (Delivery): Other Community Setting

Program Type: Aftercare/Reentry, Probation/Parole Services

Targeted Population: Prisoners

Current Program Status: Active

Listed by Other Directories: National Reentry Resource Center